Friday, September 28, 2018

What Small Businesses Should Know About Tariffs

Written by Peter J. Cazamias

 Article from Small Business Administration

Recently the United States Government announced several new tariff increases. The U.S. Department of Commerce implemented tariffs on steel and aluminum imports for national security reasons.

 Separately, the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) announced tariffs to combat unfair trade practices on certain Chinese goods. Additional tariffs on a larger list of goods from China are expected in the future.

 Small businesses should become familiar with what imported products are impacted to make informed business decisions as tariffs could increase the total cost of certain imported goods.

 What are tariffs?

Tariffs are a taxes, levies, or duties on a particular category of imports. These fees are charged as a percentage of the price of an imported good paid for by a U.S. buyer. These charges are collected by U.S. Custom and Border Protection agents at all U.S. ports of entry.


 How can I obtain a tariff waiver on my foreign purchases?

 U.S. businesses may request that individual imported products be excluded from the new tariff charges; and U.S. producers may also comment on why certain exclusions should be denied.

 The Department of Commerce and the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) have separate application procedures based on the actions taken by their organizations. Decisions are case by case and require separate individual applications for each item to be imported.

 Where can I find out more information?

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

3/4ths of the Nation’s Businesses Don’t Have Paid Employees

Written by Adam Grundy

Article from US Census Bureau

You could look at the total number of establishments in the United States using just the U.S. Census Bureau’s County Business Patterns (CBP) data. But if you did, you would only be getting a partial view of the economic landscape.

That’s because CBP only provides data on businesses that have employees on their payroll. But, in 2016, only 23.8 percent of the 32,570,855 establishments in the United States had paid employees.

That means the remaining 76.2 percent of establishments were nonemployers or establishments that don’t have any paid employees. And those data come from the 2016 Nonemployer Statistics (NES).

The majority of all business establishments in the United States are nonemployers, yet these nonemployer establishments average less than 4 percent of all sales and receipts nationally.

So, to get a full picture of U.S. businesses in 2016, you have to look at both CBP and NES data programs.

The U.S. Census Bureau just released a report that combines both sets of data for the first time.

Monday, September 24, 2018

Shoppers' State of Mind Affects Customers Experience

Excerpt from an article by Krista Garcia
To read more, visit eMarketer

"Based on the titles of two new studies, “Stress Shopping” and “Retail Nightmares,” it’s a sad state of affairs for shoppers, in-store and online.

Emotions play a role in shopping behavior even if consumers don't think that they do. According to a recent survey of UK and US internet users by analytics firm Clicktale, 78% of respondents believe they are rational when they shop.

Yet 40% said they shop to calm down, and 74% said they have "stress-shopped" in the past. Younger shoppers and women were more likely to engage in this behavior; 62% of those ages 16 to 24 stress-shop and women were 12% likelier than men to shop for this reason."

Friday, September 21, 2018

The Business Case for Healthy Buildings

The principal author is Kathleen McCormick

For the full report, go to the Urban Land Institute

Inspired by a growing body of evidence that healthy buildings can have a positive effect on human health and real estate performance, as well as the
corporate bottom line, this report highlights the key certification standards in use in the marketplace, explores recent research on the impact of health-promoting design, and offers profiles of five projects that have been early adopters of healthy building and workplace design and management practices. It reviews the
evidence and profiles some early-adopter projects that have been shown—quantitatively and qualitatively—to have had a positive impact on people’s lives and companies’
finances through healthy building design, construction, and management.

The emphasis on health and wellness is a growing global phenomenon. The global wellness real estate industry, valued at $134 billion in 2017, has increased 6.4 percent annually since 2015, and is headed toward being a $180 billion industry by 2022, according the Global Wellness Institute (GWI). Supported by a growing body of research indicating that some chronic health conditions can be prevented or reversed with lifestyle changes, and that health-promoting design can enhance productivity and reduce employee turnover and absenteeism, real estate leaders worldwide are looking to create environments that support the healthy lifestyles that employees seek in workplaces—where they spend one-third to one-half of their waking hours—and in homes that provide a platform for healthy lifestyles.

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Retain Your Great Employees. Here's How and Why It's Necessary



Excerpt from an article by Arihant Patni
To read more, visit LinkedIn

"Managing Director at Hive Technologies Key employee retention is critical to the long-term health and success of your business. Retaining best employees ensures customer satisfaction, product sales, satisfied coworkers and reporting staff, effective succession planning and organizational knowledge and learning.

As job hopping is increasingly becoming the norm, thanks in part to a workforce comprised of more millennial's who are likely to have twice as many jobs over their lifetimes as their predecessors, the baby boomers, let’s take a look at some key takeaways on how you can retain your best employees.

Financial stability motivates people to stay in a job, that’s human nature. Apart from this, health care and insurance concerns also add to the list. What you offer your employees must be comparable to other businesses in your industry."

Monday, September 17, 2018

Set your email marketing up for success


An offer for the free eBook "Step-By-Step Guide To Creating A Winning Email Marketing Campaign"
From ThomasNet

Email marketing is one of the best ways to connect with prospects and grow your business. However, it takes a lot of planning and preparation to get it right.

"Whether you are new to email marketing and want to set up your first campaign, or if you’ve been doing it awhile but need to improve your results, this step-by-step guide will help you achieve winning results.

- Learn the best way to build your contact list

- Find out how to choose the email platform that's right for you

- Get expert writing and design tips

- Find out about different tools and apps that can make your job easier

And more."

Friday, September 14, 2018

Customer Attitudes About Emerging Technologies

Excerpt from an article by Remie Arena
To read more, visit eMarketer

"A global survey by marketing platform Hubspot found that among a variety of emerging concepts, cryptocurrencies and their underlying technology, blockchain, leave the most people scratching their heads.

Interestingly, though, those surveyed seemed to perceive that blockchain and cryptocurrencies were not one in the same, because while more than one-quarter of respondents called cryptocurrencies overhyped, only 10% said the same about blockchain.

Two other emerging technologies that were also fairly widely perceived as being overhyped were driverless cars and artificial intelligence (AI). In fact, the survey found that half of respondents did not expect AI to ever have an impact on their jobs."

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Who Knew? Census Bureau Conducts Dozens of Business Surveys

By the AMERICA COUNTS STAFF

More information at the Census Bureau:

The Census Bureau call center receives hundreds of questions every month. We’re bringing you the answers to some of the most common questions in a series of podcasts. Here’s Andrew Hait from the Economic Outreach Office.



We hope this helps clear up any confusion about why you receive multiple surveys.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Most Retailers Haven't Mastered Personalization Yet

Excerpt from an article by Krista Garcia
To read more, visit eMarketer

"Much has been written about value exchange and the push-pull of consumers' willingness to give up personal info for personalization, offers or other supposed special treatment. Many US internet users, however, are reluctant to reveal anything more than their name and email address to marketers.

At the minimum, a retailer should be able to discern and differentiate a consumer at some point during a shopping journey. An April 2018 BRP (Boston Retail Partners) survey of retailers in North America found very different capacities for identifying customers in-store vs. online. That’s not completely surprising since digital activity has been easier historically to track than behavior in-store.

The bulk of customer identification in-store happens at checkout, cited by 57% of respondents. One-fifth of retailers said they couldn't ID a customer in-store at all, while 13% said they can ID a customer when they enter the store. Online customer identification is a different story."

Friday, September 07, 2018

4 Reources to Help You Create a Safe Workplace



Excerpt of an article by Joshlyn Ross

To read more visit sba.gov

When was the last time you’ve revisited your workplace safety plan? Not only is it the law, but it also can ensure that you and your employees are always safe.

In honor of National Safety Month, we would like to highlight four resources that will help you identify unsafe behaviors, create opportunities for improvement and help you (and your employees) make well-informed safety decisions on a daily basis.

1. Ensure your business meets legal requirements with OSHA

Employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace for their employees. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s role is to assure the safety and health of America's workers by setting and enforcing standards as well as providing training and education to business owners. Check out OSHA’s handbook to ensure that your small business meets the legal requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

2. Find the Workplace Health and Safety Requirements that Apply to You

Do you need help creating a workplace safety prevention plan but unsure of where to start? Follow this step-by-step guide to determine which OSHA requirements apply to your workplace and how you can comply.

3. Take advantage of training and educational programs

Now that you know what needs to be done, it’s time to execute. Get the help you need to ensure that you and your employees are prepared to handle safety and health hazards in the workplace. OSHA offers courses, educational programs and training materials that are administered by the OSHA Directorate of Training and Education.

4. Request an on-site consultation for review

Have you recently completed your workplace safety changes? Now is the time to sign up for a free on-site consultation service. Consultants will work with employers to identify workplace hazards, provide advice on compliance with OSHA standards and assist in establishing injury and illness prevention programs.

For more information on these safety tips and other resources, visit the Occupational Safety and Health Administration website.

Wednesday, September 05, 2018

Understanding Younger Baby Boomers' Digital Usage



Excerpt from an article by eMarketer Editors,

To read more visit eMarketer

Younger baby boomers are not a digitally clueless bunch, but marketers cannot assume that they are as digitally active—or as mobile in their usage—as millennials and Gen Xers. Rather, they have their own distinctive ups and downs with digital.

As commerce takes on an increasingly digital skew, many marketers will want to connect digitally with younger boomers. But they must wonder whether (and how) it can be done.

"Younger boomers were early adopters of the personal computer and email. But where do they stand in an era of smartphones and social media and ecommerce and all the rest?" asked Mark Dolliver, analyst at eMarketer and author of the new report, "Younger Baby Boomers as Digital Users: Just How Far Do They Go?"

Monday, September 03, 2018

I Don't Like Being Called a Job Creator

By Hank Green

Listen to the vlog on Hank's channel:

1. People don't hire people to create jobs, they hire people to do jobs.

2. The method through which economic opportunity and job creation occurs is complicated and involves many many people, not just the person who starts or owns or runs a business.

3. Entrepreneurship is not charity, it is only a public good if the business does good work and treats its employees fairly.