Monday, October 22, 2018

Balancing Fraud Protection and Frictionless Checkout

Written by Krista Garcia

 Article from eMarketer

 As an industry, retail is one of the most vulnerable to cybercrime. Ecommerce transactions can provide a wealth of fodder for fraudsters, including personal information and credit card details.

According to a Q2 2018 ThreatMatrix report, ecommerce companies using its digital identity network experienced 91 million attacks, which is business as usual as the figure was consistent with the same period last year.

The types of cybercrime, however, are changing. An attack rate of 24.2% means nearly one in four new accounts created on ecommerce sites in Q2 2018 were fraudulent, a 130% increase year over year.

Account login fraud using stolen credentials was the second-most common attack (10.2%) while using stolen payment credentials made up 3.0% of total attacks.

Friday, October 19, 2018

Are Your Salespeople Helpful or Just Annoying?

Written by Todd Hockenberry

Article from ThomasNet

The mindset that leads to annoying your prospects instead of helping them stems from a selfish place. If you think about the product or service first, then the logical next step is to figure out who might need this product or service, and then attack them.

Anyone who does this is not thinking about the buyers or their specific issues and goals, and is certainly not thinking about helping them first.

Salespeople are still able to control the sales process, but only if they start from a position of helping. Yes, salespeople still hold a lot of cards, but they fold right away if they lead with annoying prospecting tactics.

Many buyers do not know how to solve critical problems that your solution may be able to address. When dealing with more complex sales, buyers need a guide, an expert — someone with business smarts, not sales tricks — to help them navigate the competing visions for the future within their company.

Buyers need help not only with the product aspect of the buying process, but also with the politics they face internally. Buyers need help influencing key decision-makers and keeping the process on track. Buyers need context for their situation and a roadmap to a better future. Buyers need the right answers at the right time to keep their careers on track and to fulfill obligations to their employer

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Every Step You Take

Written by Janelle Nanos

 Article from The Boston Globe

Most of us now live at the slightly queasy intersection of consumerism and surveillance.

 The dozens of apps on our phones, most of them free, aren’t just serving up information and entertainment. Many are able to ascertain our whereabouts based on the phone’s GPS and can then sell that geolocation data to digital marketers.

 Unlike traditional print or television ads, location-based marketing has the benefit of knowing where we are, whom we’re with, and whether their ads are working.

 Geotargeted mobile marketing is one of the fastest growing forms of advertising — and one of the most controversial. It has arisen in part because, as more of us use streaming and on-demand viewing services, we’re watching far fewer television ads. And because so many of us carry our smartphones at all times, digital marketers have seized the opportunity to gather and sell data on where we are, what we do — and what we might want to buy.

 In 2017, marketers spent $17.1 billion on geotargeted mobile ads, and the research firm BIA Advisory Services forecasts that number will more than double to $38.7 billion by 2022.

Monday, October 15, 2018

For Certain Types of Purchases, Influencers Have More Sway

Author: Krista Garcia
For the full article, go to eMarketer

Even with recent reports of fraud and fake followers, influencer marketing continues to be big business. According to measurement firm Points North Group, influencer ad spending by brands in the US and Canada totaled $211 million in Q2 2018. Nearly three-quarters ($150 million) was devoted to Instagram.

A February 2018 survey by influencer marketing agency Activate found that 88.9% of influencers worldwide said they were using Instagram for influencer marketing campaigns more than they did a year ago.

Despite Instagram's growing prominence in influencer marketing, an April 2018 CPC Strategy study showed Facebook was the leading platform where US internet users heard about new products, events or services from people they follow. Nearly 70% cited the ubiquitous social network, while Instagram (11.3%) and YouTube (9.5%) ranked a distant second and third. This survey was comprised of all age ranges, though, and many influencer campaigns are targeted at younger consumers. Gen Z has different preferences. To wit, Instagram was the most influential among internet users ages 13 to 17 and nearly on par with Facebook among those ages 18 to 24.

Friday, October 12, 2018

Early signs of Christmas make people crabby

Written by Anne Stych

Article from bizwomen

It’s only October, but Christmas decorations are already in stores — and a lot of people find that annoying.

  According to a new Coinstar Holiday Survey, more than a third - 36 percent - of people surveyed say it's irritating that retailers put up holiday decorations and merchandise as early as September or October, although CBS reported some studies show that people who put up their Christmas decorations early are healthier and happier than those who don’t.

 For those who are out of sorts it may be because the decorations remind them they have a lot of shopping to do. And for one in five people, just thinking about holiday shopping stresses them out.

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

How Long Does It Take to Start a Franchise?

Written by Joel Libava

Article from the Small Business Administration

Purchasing a franchise involves many steps — and a lot of time and effort.

But, if you’re organized, and you’ve taken the time to learn all you can about franchising, you’ll be able to speed up the process.

Purchasing Steps:

1. The Search

Typically, you’ll visit several different franchise opportunity websites until you narrow it down to a few franchises that look interesting. Here are three things you should be looking for in a franchise.

2. Contacting A Franchisor

This step is a big one, because it involves formally requesting information about a specific franchise. Expect to get a phone call from a franchise salesperson.

3. Research

This step involves reading the Franchise Disclosure Document (FDD) and calling franchisees so you can request earnings information, as well as conducting other basic market research.

If you’re still interested, you may be invited to visit franchise headquarters for what’s known as a “Discovery Day.” This is your chance to meet with the team face-to-face, ask questions, and watch the business operate in person.


Monday, October 08, 2018

Wallets Full, Shoppers Ready to Crank Up Holiday Spend


Written by Jen King

Article from eMarketerr

A survey from adtech company OpenX conducted last month by The Harris Poll found that more than eight in 10 shoppers say they will spend at least as much as they did last year. Fully 26% of respondents said they plan to spend more; 18% plan to reel in spending.

Millennials (those ages 18 to 34) and parents were particularly ready to open their wallets. On average, parents estimated they’ll spend upwards of $1,000 on gifts, compared with millennials’ planned $860 spend.

Underpinning shoppers' willingness to spend is a sense of financial stability. More than half of respondents (55%) believe the economy is better now than it was a year ago, and three-fourths are confident that economic improvement will continue.

Interestingly, millennials were a bit less sanguine about the economy, with slightly less than half (48%) saying things are better now compared with last year. But like shoppers in general, they are optimistic, with 77% seeing improvements on the horizon.

The Minty-Fresh Way to Fail At Business

Written by Dan Lewis

 Article from Now I Know

 More than 200 years ago, a New York City man named William Colgate made a living making and selling soap and candles.

 Today, his name makes up half of that of a multi-billion dollar consumer goods corporation known as Colgate-Palmolive.

 They, basically, make three types of stuff: soaps (one being Palmolive itself) toothpaste and other oral care products (under the Colgate brand) and, perhaps surprisingly, pet food.

 In 1976, Colgate-Palmolive, via a series of mergers whose history isn’t worth going into, added the Hill’s Science Diet product line (and related ones) to their offerings. They decided not to re-brand the pet food under the Colgate brand because that would be, well, stupid.

Who wants to feed their dog toothpaste-flavored kibble? Could you imagine pet food being included among these products?

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

For Many, Reaching Out to Customer Service Isn’t Enjoyable

Written by Jen King

Article from eMarketer

Contacting customer service is a frustrating experience for many consumers, especially if it gets them nowhere.

According to a June 2018 survey from cloud-based solutions provider LogMeIn, nearly a quarter (23.6%) of internet users in North America—who have contacted a brand for support in the past six months—say their problem was never solved. Those who did manage to get it resolved said it took way too long (33.7%).

Others (38.5%) hated the fact that they had to repeat themselves over and over to other customer service agents as their query was escalated.

Monday, October 01, 2018

How to Develop Your Business Strategy

Written by: Tim Berry

See the complete article at Bplans


Strategy is what you’re not doing. My favorite metaphor is the sculptor with a block of marble—the art is what he chips off the block, not what he leaves in. Michelangelo started with a big chunk of marble and chipped pieces off of it until it was his David.

At the real-world level—my favorite—strategy is like driving and sex: we all think we’re pretty good at it. But simplifying, doing today what will seem obvious tomorrow, is genius. I say the best strategies seem obvious as soon as you understand them. Furthermore, it seems to me that if they don’t seem obvious after the fact, they didn’t work...

Think of it as the heart of the business, like the heart of the artichoke. It’s a group of core concepts that can’t be separated: problem, solution, market, and identity. Don’t pull them apart. It’s the interrelationship between them that drives your business. Each affects the other three.