Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Women, Working Families, and Unions

One of every nine women in the United States (11.8 percent in 2013) is represented by a union at her place of work.

The annual number of hours of paid work performed by women has increased dramatically over the last four decades. In 1979, the typical woman was on the job 925 hours per year; by 2012, the typical woman did 1,664 hours of paid work per year.

Meanwhile, women's share of unpaid care work and housework has remained high. Various time-use studies conclude that women continue to do about two-thirds of unpaid child-care (and elder-care) work and at least 60 percent of routine housework.

The research reviewed here suggests that unions can provide substantial support to women trying to balance their paid work and their unpaid care responsibilities.

Unionized women earn, on average, 13 percent (about $2.50 dollars per hour) more than similar non-union women. The large union wage advantage holds for women across all education levels and even in typically low-wage occupations, including hotel cleaners, office cleaners, child-care workers, and health aides.

More from the Center for Economic and Policy Research

No comments: